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Boston’s historic Fish Pier has changed with the times

Boston’s historic Fish Pier has changed with the times, but stays true to its roots

As a staple of the harbor, Atlantic Coast Seafood remains a favorite while dog-treat company Polka Dog is a newer addition to the waterfront.



AS ERIKA TARANTAL TELLS US, IT’S STILL A WORKING WATERFRONT. ERIKA: HIGH-END RESTAURANTS, GLEAMING GLASS SKYSCRAPERS, AND EVER-CHANGING WATERFRONT SPRAWL SURROUNDS BOSTON’S FISH PIER. >> PEOPLE ASKED ME EVERY DAY HOW IT IS STILL DOWN HERE. ERIKA: HIS FAMILY STARTED ATLANTIC COAST SEAFOOD IN 1896. >> I AM THE THIRD GENERATION. ERIKA: HE OWNS THE PROCESSING AND WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTION FACILITY, ONE OF 29 BUSINESSES IS LOCATED AT THE FISH PIER. HE SAYS THE HARBORSIDE LOCATION IS STILL VITAL TO THE COMPANY’S SURVIVAL. >> WE DO A LOT OF EXPORTING TO EUROPE. IT IS GREAT TO BE SO CLOSE TO LOGAN AIRPORT. ERIKA: MUCH OF THE FRESH FISH PROCESSED YEAR ENDS UP SERVED AT LOCAL RESTAURANTS. >> AS THE FISH COMES IN THROUGH THE BACKDOOR, MY EMPLOYEES BREAK IT DOWN AND FULFILL IT AT RESTAURANTS IN THE LOCAL AREA. WE HAVE SQUID FRESH CAUGHT AT NANTUCKET SOUND. IT IS SEASONAL. WE DO FOUR TO FIVE YEARS ON IT. ERIKA: FISHERMEN HAVE BEEN UNLOADING THEIR FISH ON THE PIER FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY. >> I HAVE SEEN A LOT OF PEOPLE COME AND GO. I AM STILL HERE AND INTEND TO BE HERE FOR A LONG TIME. ERIKA: A NEW KID ON THE DOCK IS ALSO CARRYING ON THE LEGACY OF THE HISTORIC SEAPORT IN A MUCH DIFFERENT WAY. THIS BAKERY CATERS TO A SOPHISTICATED CLIENTELE WITH DISCERNING PALLETS. >> THEY ARE REALLY HEALTHY, GREAT TREATS FOR DOGS. THEY ARE GOOD FOR DOGS WHO HAVE PROTEIN ALLERGIES, IF THEY LIKE CHICKEN OR BEEF. THEY ARE VERY EASY TO DIGEST. ERIKA: DEB STARTED POLKA DOG BAKERY IN 2000 TWO, QUICKLY EXPANDING TO EIGHT LOCATIONS AND SHIPPING WORLDWIDE. SHOULD OPEN A NEW KITCHEN ON THE FISH PIER IN 2019. SHE SAYS THE LOCATION ENABLES POLKA DOG TO SOURCE FRESH FISH FROM THEIR SEAPORT NEIGHBORS. >> COD SKINS ARE ONE OF OUR MOST POPULAR TREATS. WE BRING IN ABOUT 10,000 POUNDS OF ROCK COD SKINS A WEEK. ERIKA: DEB SAYS IT IS IMPORTANT TO KEEP THE FISH PIER OPEN AND THRIVING. SHE IS PROUD TO BE A PART OF THE NEW GENERATION OF ENTREPRENEURS. >> THE HISTORY IS SO VALUABLE. IT IS IMPORTANT TO KEEP THOSE UNIQUE PARTS ABOUT BOSTON. ERIKA: THE FISH PIER IS OWNED BY THE MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY. THE CEO SAYS BUSINESSES ON THE PEER HELPED SUSTAIN A THRIVING AND DIVERSIFIED ECONOMY. >> HISTORIC BOSTON FISH PIER IS SUCH A GEM. WE LIKE TO THINK OF IT IS THE SOUL OF THE SEAPORT. ERIKA: SHE SAYS THE ENTIRE WORKING PART OF BOSTON HAS ALWAYS BEEN CRITICAL FOR THE REGION’S ECONOMY. >> GENERATES $8 BILLION OF ECONOMIC IMPACT AND SUPPORTS MORE THAN 66,000 JOBS. THESE ARE REALLY IMPORTANT BLUE-COLLAR JOBS THAT DRIVE A DIVERSIFIED ECONOMY. WHEN WE TALK ABOUT MAKING INVESTMENTS IN NEW CRANES AND ADVANCEMENTS IN OUR CRUISE TERMINAL, IT IS ABOUT SUPPORTING THE LOCAL ECONOMY. ERIKA: SHE SAYS THE FUTURE OF THE WORKING PORT RELIES ON INVESTMENT IN ASSETS AND REDUCING THE IMPACT THE PORT HAS ON THE ENVIRONMENT. MANY GETTING THREATS RELATED TO CLIMATE CHANGE IS ALSO A PRIORITY FOR THE CITY. >> WHEN WE MAKE INVESTMENTS IN OUR INFRASTRUCTURE, WHEN WE DO UPGRADES, WE SHOULD ALWAYS BE THINKING 20, 50 YEARS OUT, BECAUSE THAT IS HOW LONG WE EXPECT THOSE THINGS TO LAST. ERIKA: REVERENT HAMMOND IS BOSTON’S CHIEF OF ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY, AND OPEN SPACE. >> IT WOULD BE NOT JUST UNWISE, BUT IN MY OPINION IMMORAL FOR US TO DO THINGS NOW THAT DON’T TAKE INTO ACCOUNT WHAT WE KNOW IS COMING. THE HARBOR IS CHANGING. ERIKA: SHE POINTS TO MOBLEY PARK, WHERE SOUTH BOSTON AND DORCHESTER MEET, AND HARBOR WATERS POSE A FLOOD THREAT. >> PLAN IS TO REDESIGN IT. LOOKING AT ABOUT $250 MILLION TO REDESIGN IT, AS A PLACE TO RECREATE AND HAVE FUN, BUT REALLY IS A LARGE, NATURE-BASED SOLUTION TO DEAL WITH THE WATER WE KNOW IS COMING. ERIKA: THE STONE LIVING LAB STUDIES NATURE-BASED APPROACHES TO CLIMATE CHANGE. >> LAB LAUNCHED IN OCTOBER 2020, AND IT IS A UNIQUE PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN BOSTON HARBOR NOW, THE UMASS SCHOOL FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, AND STATE, LOCAL, AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. ERIKA: THE LAB WORKS ON CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS THAT MIMIC NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS, AS OPPOSED TO CONCRETE WALLS AND BARRIERS. >> THE TWO STORMS IN 2018 REMINDED PEOPLE THAT CLIMATE CHANGE IS HAPPENING NOW AND FLOODING IS HAPPENING NOW AND ALL THE KING TIDE EVENTS DO THE SAME. IT IS IMPORTANT FOR US TO COLLECTIVELY FOCUS ON THIS AND KEEP IT AT THE FOREFRONT OF OUR POLICY AND FUNDING AGENDAS. ERIKA: REVEREND WHITE-HAMMOND SAYS THE NEED TO INVEST IN NATURE-BASED SOLUTIONS IS URGENT. >> WHEN YOU LOOK AT OLD MAPS OF BOSTON BEFORE WE FILLED IN ALL THE LAND, IN ESSENCE, THE WATER IS TAKING THE LAND BACK. WHEN YOU LOOK AT WHERE FLOODING IS LIKELY TO GO FROM THE HARBOR INTO THE CITY, MANY TIMES IT IS GOING RIGHT INTO THE AREAS THAT WE FILLED IN HUNDREDS OF YEARS AGO. JOHN: WHITE-HAMMOND SAYS IMPROVEMENTS MADE IN BOSTON’S NORTH END ARE GREAT EXAMPLES OF NATURE-BASED SOLUTIONS. THE HARBOR WALK AND OTHER PARK

Boston’s historic Fish Pier has changed with the times, but stays true to its roots

As a staple of the harbor, Atlantic Coast Seafood remains a favorite while dog-treat company Polka Dog is a newer addition to the waterfront.

High-end restaurants, towering glass skyscrapers, and an ever-changing waterfront surround Boston’s Fish Pier, which is still home to 29 maritime-related businesses. Atlantic Coast Seafood has been called the Fish Pier home since 1986. Polka Dog Bakery, which processes seafood into dog treats, is a newer addition to the working waterfront. The Fish Pier is owned by Massport, whose CEO called it “the soul of the Seaport.” Strong coastal storms lead to flooding of Boston Harbor, threatening property and infrastructure. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu’s Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space, Mariama White-Hammond, says the city is hard at work developing climate resilience plans to protect such high-risk locations as Moakley Park, where Dorchester and South Boston meet.

High-end restaurants, towering glass skyscrapers, and an ever-changing waterfront surround Boston’s Fish Pier, which is still home to 29 maritime-related businesses. Atlantic Coast Seafood has been called the Fish Pier home since 1986. Polka Dog Bakery, which processes seafood into dog treats, is a newer addition to the working waterfront. The Fish Pier is owned by Massport, whose CEO called it “the soul of the Seaport.”

Strong coastal storms lead to flooding of Boston Harbor, threatening property and infrastructure. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu’s Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space, Mariama White-Hammond, says the city is hard at work developing climate resilience plans to protect such high-risk locations as

Moakley Park, where Dorchester and South Boston meet.

.